Watching television with my parents…

…is like explaining the world to a two-year-old.

Surely this isn’t unusual. There aren’t many television shows that apply to both generations; and so the silent protests begin.

My parents have a couple of quite distinctive ways of dealing with the television. To illustrate this, I’ve picked some scenarios.

My parents and the television program

First Scenario: The scornful grunt

So, my sister and I have a long tradition of watching TV-series for entertainment. Sorry we don’t spend all our television-time watching documentaries. So whenever anything like Grey’s Anatomy, Navy C.I.S. or the adverts (which she often mistakes for some cheap reality show) are on, she will walk through the room and go: “Ah-ha…” or, a little more obvious: “What’s this crap you’re watching?”. And don’t tell me she denies the worth of technology for entertain, because most of time, she’ll walk through the room, “Ah-ha…” and sit down, open her tablet and start browsing Facebook or play Words with Friends.

Oh and on some occasions she’ll start watching one of those “crap” TV-shows and realize it’s actually quite good.

Second scenario: The one who came in after half of the show and spent the other half asking what happened in the first half, thereby missing the second part and asking questions about that too

The title says it all. My father is – slow sometimes. Sometimes, as I said, he comes in after one half and asks us “Who’s he?” or “What’s his problem?”. Other times though, he is there from the very beginning and yet, he somehow manages to miss half of the film. Yes, ok, most of the time what we watch is in German, but that doesn’t excuse the comments he makes when he isn’t asking questions. For example; somebody just died, it’s really sad and he goes: “He looks a bit pale.”

WHY?

https://i2.wp.com/fc04.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/104/8/3/keep_calm_and_shut_up____by_yinandyang2011-d4w796o.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/fc04.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/104/8/3/keep_calm_and_shut_up____by_yinandyang2011-d4w796o.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/fc04.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/104/8/3/keep_calm_and_shut_up____by_yinandyang2011-d4w796o.jpgThird scenario: TV on, start talking

Yes, communication is important, I value it very much, face to face. Thing is, my sister and I have a long tradition of watching Navy C.I.S on a sunday. It’s an on-off tradition, I stopped for a while after Kate died, but anyway, it’s tradition, ok?

But as my mother doesn’t count a show like that as valuable use of time (unlike playing Facebook games, of course), she just talks in complete disregard of the fact we are actively watching television. And see, when my mother talks – well, when my parents talk – you wonder if they may have gone deaf. And of course the hint of turning the sound up on the TV just makes them (as they will often initiate a conversation with each other) talk/shout even louder. I mean, our house isn’t exactly small! And they have a private bedroom to retreat to!
There is no point in watching television if you cannot hear what is being said.

Fourth scenario: The musical pans

Our pans our very bad at making music. It sounds more like Heavy Metal gone wrong. So, same principle as above; we can’t hear anything on the TV. It’s great of my dad to do the dishes. But whenever he does, it sounds more like he’s fighting one of those Transformers. This is more of a general thing, but it’s most annoying when you’re trying to watch television, especially as it seems like he’s trying to say: “Look at me, I’m doing something useful. How’s your TV-Show?”

This evening, they did all four! First, my dad got up from watching TV to soundly do the dishes, then returned and commented and asked a series of questions. Then my mother came in, grunted and started having a loud conversation with my dad. All during one episode of about an hour!

I don’t watch that much television, ok? And my parents had television as children! I asked Wikipedia! It’s not a world unknown to them!

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